Mosque, Arabic masjid or jāmiʿ, any house or open area of prayer in Islam. The Arabic word masjid means “a place of prostration” to God, and the same word is used in Persian, Urdu, and Turkish.

Two main types of mosques can be distinguished: the masjid jāmiʿ, or “collective mosque,” a large state-controlled mosque that is the centre of community worship and the site of Friday prayer services; and smaller mosques operated privately by various groups within society.

The first mosques were modeled on the place of worship of the Prophet Muhammad—the courtyard of his house at Medina—and were simply plots of ground marked out as sacred. Though the mosque as such has undergone many architectural changes, the building remains essentially an open space, generally roofed over, containing a miḥrāb and a minbar, with a minaret sometimes attached to it. The miḥrāb, a semicircular niche reserved for the imām to lead the prayer, points to the qiblah—i.e., the direction of Mecca. The minbar, a seat at the top of steps placed at the right of the miḥrāb, is used by the preacher (khaṭīb) as a pulpit. In the early days of Islam the rulers delivered their speeches from the minbar. Occasionally there is also a maqsūrah, a box or wooden screen near the miḥrāb, which was originally designed to shield a worshipping ruler from assassins. Mats or carpets cover the floor of the mosque, where the ritual prayer (ṣalāt) is performed by rows of men who bow and prostrate themselves under the imām’s guidance.

Outside the mosque stands the minaret (maʾdhanah), which was originally any elevated place but now usually a tower. It is used by the muezzin (muʾadhdhin, “crier”) to proclaim the call to worship (adhān) five times each day. A place for ablution, containing running water, is usually attached to the mosque but may be separated from it.

00:0200:30

Beginning with Muhammad’s own house, mosques came to be used for many public functions—military, political, social, and educational. Schools and libraries were often attached to medieval mosques (e.g., al-Azhar mosque in Cairo). The mosque also functioned as a court of justice until the introduction of secular law into many Islamic countries in modern times. Whereas many of the social, educational, and political functions of the mosque have been taken over by other institutions in modern times, it remains a centre of considerable influence. In some cases a maktab (elementary school) is attached to a mosque, mainly for the teaching of the Qurʾān, and informal classes in law and doctrine are given for people of the surrounding neighbourhood.

Leave a comment

About Us

Suspendisse auctor erat non posuere pellentesque. In hac habitasse platea dictumst.

Open Hours

Mon - Fri 9 AM - 6 PMSaturday 9 AM - 4 PMSunday Closed

Contacts

123, Lorem Street, Chicago, IL, 55085Phone: (123) 456-78-90Email: sales@yoursite.com

AxiomThemes © 2021 All rights reserved. Terms of use and Privacy Policy